The A –“thine” and “eyes” is assonance. On

The Tyger By William Blake

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

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In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare sieze the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art.
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,
And watered heaven with their tears,
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

The Tyger is a poem written by William Blake in 1794. It
Throughout the poem, he uses apostrophe, repetition, alliteration, internal rhyme, and imagery.
It is made up of six quatrains, which consists of an AABB rhyme scheme:

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright A –“burning bright” is alliteration. “Tyger! Tyger!”
In the forests of the night, A
What immortal hand or eye B
Could frame thy fearful symmetry? B — “thy” and “symmetry” form internal rhyme.

In what distant deeps or skies A –“distant deeps” is alliteration.
Burnt the fire of thine eyes? A –“thine” and “eyes” is assonance.
On what wings dare he aspire? B –“what wings” is alliteration.
What the hand dare sieze the fire? B

And what shoulder, & what art. A –repetition
Could twist the sinews of thy heart? A
And when thy heart began to beat, B –“And” and “began” is internal rhyme.
What dread hand? & what dread feet? B –repetition.

What the hammer? what the chain? A –repetition.
In what furnace was thy brain? A
What the anvil? what dread grasp B –repetition.
Dare its deadly terrors clasp? B –“Dare its deadly” is alliteration. “Dare” and “terrors” is internal rhyme”.

When the stars threw down their spears, A
And watered heaven with their tears, A –euphony
Did he smile his work to see? B –euphony. “he” and “see” form internal rhyme.
Did he who made the Lamb make thee? B –repetition (with the previous line).

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright A
In the forests of the night, A
What immortal hand or eye B
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry? B –“frame thy fearful” is alliteration.

The poem starts with the author asking a tiger, whose fur is bright orange, who created him. Blake then asks the tiger many questions about who created him, and how they created him. Then he asks “Did he who made the Lamb make thee?”. Wikipedia says that William Blake also wrote a poem called “The Lamb”. He is suggesting it may of been himself whom created the tiger. Wikipedia also says that William Blake was a professional engraver. An engraver’s work is similar to a blacksmith’s, and a few of the questions that Blake asks the tiger are about a blacksmith’s tools: What the hammer? what the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? When asking about the blacksmith’s materials and tools, he is really asking questions that apply to himself.
William Blake is the creator the poem, The Lamb, and is the creator of the tiger in the poem. When one first reads the poem, the tiger in the poem is thought of as an animal. However, the tiger in the poem is spelt Tyger, not Tiger. Therefore, the “tiger” in the poem isn’t an animal, it is the poem itself.
So, in the poem, William Blake isn’t asking an animal who created him, Blake is asking the poem who created him. When Blake is asking the poem who created his heart and other parts of his body: And what shoulder, & what art. Could twist the sinews of thy heart? He is asking who created different components of the poem. The heart is a metaphor for the rhyme scheme and all the different poetic devices. The shoulder is a metaphor for the author’s pen (or whatever writing tool they used in the 18th century).

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