In popular culture

In popular culture, black feminism makes seldom appearances due to prevalent white dominance. Anomalies to this objective fact include individuals Toni Morrison and Beyonce Knowles. In the very first pages of The Bluest Eye, Morrison illustrates how the perfect nuclear family ought to work. Jane, a young white child and subject of the passage, is expressed as a character with a kind and gentle disposition. When presenting Pecola, Claudia, Frieda, Maureen, and Rosemary—all little girls of color—to the audience, Morrison includes powerlessness and disarray to the characteristics of being a young lady. Beyoncé’s visual album Lemonade is about the investigation of black culture. Beyoncé praises the black body and black history; she declines to conform to societal convictions of “excellence”, by celebrating the regular magnificence the black ladies already have. This can be seen by the pictures of black ladies wearing “high society” 1800’s attire. Here, Beyoncé uses the dichotomy of the upper-class and women of color; the black community was actually of a lower-class due to the ever-present impact of slavery. By dressing black women in 1800’s upper-class attire, Beyoncé is making a political statement that black women have the same value as any other woman.

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