Chance Phillips Tyler Breedlove English 101-17 11 September 2018 Growth Mindset Definition In Carol Dweck’s Mindset she established two mindsets

Chance Phillips
Tyler Breedlove
English 101-17
11 September 2018

Growth Mindset Definition
In Carol Dweck’s Mindset she established two mindsets, growth mindset and fixed mindset. A mindset is one’s train of thought that controls their behavior and attitude toward their surroundings. Dweck explains that the growth mindset is a thought process based on the basic belief that your qualities are things you can developed. According to Dweck (2006) the most important part of a fixed mindset is constantly putting in effort to become better than you once were (p. 16).
Growth minded individuals believe that they can always improve themselves, learn new abilities, and change their intelligence (p. 12). This belief is deeply rooted in their minds and heavily influences how they react to everyday situations. Growth minded students that that struggle with school are driven to study harder on upcoming assignments and tests. Growth minded individuals react this way because they have a natural disposition to challenge that drives them to put forth more effort in their everyday life. Along with challenges in the classroom, growth minded people believe effort is also important in relationships.
Relationships with growth minded individuals often are driven by effort. In the eyes of a growth minded person, they believe that a relationship should be developed over time. They believe that qualities and beliefs can be changed in order to improve the relationship. This differs extremely from the ideas of fixed minded individuals who view effort as an issue in relationships. Growth minders believe that relationships require a lot of hard work to keep it going steadily. Dweck explains that every relationship expert agrees that relationships involve working around spousal differences, and loads of effort (Dweck p. 149-150).
Growth minded individuals believe effort is crucial in all areas of their life, especially in succeeding and accomplishing great feats.
Dweck explains the process of how Thomas Edison created the lightbulb in Mindset. He did not create it miraculously his first try, it took many months of effort (Dweck, p. 55-56). Edison’s mindset and drive set him apart from all the other inventors of the time, and these were both some of his strongest attributes that he used to be remembered in history (Dweck p. 56). In the Marva Collins case, a inner city elementary teacher, her never ending effort allowed her to teach the worst readers in the school how to read and quote Shakespeare by the fifth grade (Dweck p. 64-65).

Works Cited

Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. New York, NY: Random House.